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Public Health Notifiable Diseases - Common topics - State and Territory Links

Note Some information on this page copied from SA Dept of Human Services web site.
Introduction
Infectious diseases are illnesses caused by the spread of microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi or parasites) to humans from other humans, animals or the environment. These pages aim to give a basic understanding of the ways infectious diseases are spread and simple, practical advice for preventing the spread of infectious disease in the home and community.

Specific infectious diseases are listed and described under (Disease Descriptions). Diseases have been included because they occur commonly or because they cause particular concern in the community. The names used are those by which these conditions are usually known, for example, impetigo is listed under school sores.

Some of the infectious diseases are described as (listing and stats from NNDSS here) notifiable. In Australia, this means that the doctor (or laboratory) diagnosing this disease is required by law, to notify all cases to the Communicable Disease Control Branch of the State Health Department. Notification ensures that steps are taken, where necessary, to prevent the spread of an infectious disease to other people in the community.

Northern Territory:

NT Notifiable Diseases ACT 7th April 1999

South Australia:

Acts of Parliament

The Acts of Parliament under which the Public & Environmental Health Service has a statutory role are:

  • Public & Environmental Health Act (1987)
  • Food Act (1985)
  • Supported Residential Facilities Act (1992)
  • Radiation Protection and Control Act (1982)

  • Radiation Protection and Control (Transport of Radioactive Substances) Regulations (1991)
    Ionizing Radiation Regulations (1985)
  • Controlled Substances Act (1984)
  • SA Health Commission Act (1976)
  • Tobacco Products Regulation Act (1997)
To search for the text of State & Commonwealth legislation go to the Parliament of South Australia website or the Australian Legal Information Institute (AustLII) website.

Standing Committees

The Public & Environmental Health Service also participates in and supports a variety of formal standing committees which provide inter-agency liaison and enable sharing of expertise and information and which report to Ministers and/or Parliament:

     
  • Controlled Substances Advisory Council
  • Health Aspects of Electromagnetic Radiation Committee
  • Health Aspects of Water Quality Committee
  • Public and Environmental Health Council
  • Radiation Protection Committee
Under review

As part of its role, the Public & Environmental Health Service keeps public health legislation under review to ensure relevance and effectiveness, and endeavours to maintain sufficient resources to meet statutory responsibilities. P&EHS is currently undertaking to:

     
  • Review food legislation.
  • Seek to clarify the respective roles of State and local government, particularly in relation to food quality matters.
  • Participate in the national review of public health legislation under the National Public Health Partnership to promote greater uniformity and minimise unnecessary anti-competition elements.
  • Implement the provisions of the Tobacco Products Regulation Act relating to sales to minors and smoking in public dining areas in conjunction with key stakeholders

Victoria:

Victorian Public Health Surveillance Information

Queensland:

Public Health Information - Queensland

New South Wales:

NSW Public Health Pages

Tasmania:

Tasmanian Leglisation
Tasmanian Dept of Health and Human Services
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